60 million women in America and Europe take oral contraceptives. In my opinion, this is a tragedy.

Let me explain why.

The birth control pill: one of the biggest threats to your Femininity, your health, your relationship, your ability to attract the man of your dreams, and probably one of the major causes for any health problem you currently have in your life (if you are taking the birth control pill).

I’m also going to tell you that the birth control pill can really mess up your ability to choose the right man, it can cloud your judgment when it comes to knowing whether you are with the right man, and it can cause relationship breakdown. Yes, really.

If you don’t have the time to digest the information in this article, I’m going to simply tell you this: Start using alternative contraception methods (if you are on the pill).

(Click here to take the quiz on “How Naturally Feminine Am I Actually?”)

The deadly side effects of the birth control pill

Now let’s get in to specifics. The pill is a dangerous drug. One of the biggest guarantees of you getting in touch with your femininity, your sexuality and your sensuality, is your hormones. And the birth control pill exposes women to synthetic hormones.

It is very unhealthy for a woman to be exposed to synthetic hormones. In fact, long-term use of this drug can cause women to develop serious chronic illness. The birth control pill depletes a woman’s body of important nutrients, can cause the thinning of your bones, increases your risk of developing breast cancer (any type of cancer really) and blood clots.

Aside from these side effects, the birth control pill can also cause these side effects:

  • Increased risk of breast and cervical cancers
  • Increased risk of blood clotting, heart attack and stroke
  • Migraines
  • Gall bladder disease
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Weight gain
  • Mood changes
  • Nausea
  • Irregular bleeding or spotting
  • Benign liver tumors
  • Breast tenderness
  • Yeast overgrowth and infection

See more on the deadly side effects of the birth control pill. A good article on Dr. Mercola’s Natural Health website.

How the pill can effect your choice in partner

For many women on this website, they are looking to get in touch with their femininity, join a new sisterhood, and improve their relationships. Many women also want to find the right man – but if you are on the birth control pill, it could very likely be damaging your ability to choose the RIGHT man. (Click here to take the quiz on “Am I Dating a Commitment Friendly Man?”)

If you do not believe me, please take a look at Dr. Mercola’s article on this topic. He owns and operates the most visited natural health site on the planet:

How Contraceptive Pill Influences Partner Choice – a must-read for any woman looking to understand health and her relationships more.

Researchers have discovered a ‘secret sex nerve’ that controls who we are attracted to. This olfactory nerve may be the nerve through which pheromones are processed. We are naturally more attracted to people whose scent is genetically dissimilar to our own. With the exception for pregnant women.

Pregnant women tend to be attracted to people with a similar scent. Hormonal contraceptives fool a woman’s body in to thinking she is pregnant. This is one reason why taking the pill can sometimes cause you to stop being attracted to your partner, if you were once attracted to him!

The effect of the pill on your sex drive

Most of you may already know that taking the birth control pill can (in some cases) permanently damage a woman’s sex drive.

As I have discussed before, the only difference between a relationship and a friendship is intimacy. And if your sex drive is low, non-existent, and causing your hormones to go out-of-whack, your relationship is going to suffer. To learn more about why sex is important in a relationship, please see my article on ‘5 Reasons Why Women Shouldn’t Deprive Their Man of Sex’.

Most women do report some sort of change in their sex drive when they are on the pill.

Reasons why women take the pill

Granted, there are many women who start taking the birth control pill for reasons other than contraception (I am one of those women). Some women take it for treatment of irregular menstrual cycles, irregular bleeding, endometriosis, acne or cysts.

As is true with any drug, taking the pill is not treating the underlying causes of the problem. In some cases, medication is necessary. But most of us use drugs to change our biochemistry. This is unnecessary.

You can change your biochemistry by changing your ‘state’, by moving your body. Something that is out of the scope of this article.

Do you take the birth control pill for contraception?

If you take the birth control pill for contraception, and are wondering what you would do if you didn’t take the pill, there are alternatives. Less convenient, yes, but potentially more beneficial for your health. And I’m not talking about other, injectable birth control. Because this can be dangerous too. See Dr. Mercola’s article on: Major Warnings on Injectable Birth Control

Yes, research has shown that the pill may causes less risk of SOME cancers, but can in-turn cause a higher risk for others. What’s the point?

The pill puts unnecessarily large amounts of estrogen in a woman’s body. Hormones are such a crucial part of your overall health, and most people are conditioned to reach for a drug to ‘fix’ their problem. There are other contraception methods that will work, and can be just as effective. See this article:

Natural Birth Control Just As Effective, Much Safer Than Hormones

How Oral Contraceptives can Harm Your Baby

3% of women who take oral contraceptives become pregnant without knowing it. This means that women are also subjecting/exposing their baby to drugs for several months in to the pregnancy. Needless to say, this poses a risk to not only the mother’s health, but to the baby’s as well.

Please see this article: How Oral Contraceptives Hurt Your Baby to find out more on this topic.

Stories from my own life

I have known many women who DO take the birth control pill. And every single one of them has had negative side effects. Some more serious than others. Personally, I went to a dermatologist when I was 15 with severe acne problems. No drug worked. So the dermatologist reluctantly put me on the birth control pill, which worked pretty rapidly.

I was happy, my family was happy (they wanted me to be rid of my acne).

Stupidly, I became reliant on the birth control pill to keep my skin clear. I wish I hadn’t. Whilst on it, I had all sorts of severe health problems that doctor’s could not detect the cause of (not that medical science can detect everything anyway). I was unfortunately uninformed about the pill, and at such a young age – I just took the dermatologist’s advice. I assumed it was normal to take the pill for acne, as several of my friends did exactly the same thing.

One problem is that over the years, there has been a severe lack of available information to women about the birth control (GOOD information and warnings, especially).

Like many other things in our society, the contraceptive pill is a quick-fix. And it’s not even a fix. It’s meant to help you enjoy sex without getting pregnant, but with the damage it does to a woman’s libido (sometimes permanently), it actually works against its own claims.

When I came off of it (thanks for Dr. Mercola’s very passionate warnings), I don’t think there was a single symptom under the sun that I DIDN’T have. Including heart palpitations, hair falling out in what it seemed like chunks for 6 months straight, migraines, rashes, loss of feeling in my legs and right arm (for the duration of a couple of hours), nausea, vertigo – I could go on forever really.

To put it simply, my experience with the pill has been bad. And even a whole year wasn’t long enough for my body to normalize itself.

I have a friend who has waited 9 months to get her period back. This is considered ‘normal’ in the medical world (it can take up to a year) – but no feminine woman wants to wait nearly a whole year to just GET her period again, does she? And then wait another year or so for it to normalize?! As it turns out, my friend also has a cyst on her ovaries.

This lady had a heart-attack because of the birth control pill: the pill gave me a heart attack and she has another group: my birth control pill gave me a heart attack

I might also add that I have known several women who skip the ‘sugar pill’ section of the pill cycle. A fantastic way to do even MORE damage to your body. By the way, if you DO decide to get off the pill, wait until you are in the sugar pill section to get off of it. 🙂

Our body is our temple. Take care of it. Nurture it. And if you have any girlfriends still on the pill, please forward this article to them. Every woman needs to hear it.

Yes – for some women, they seem to experience no side effects. Are you one of these women?

On another topic, I know that you’re wondering what naturally attracts men… click here to learn about the 17 Attraction Triggers.

Have you ever been on the pill? Did you experience any negative side-effects? Have your friends had any bad side effects? please let us know in the comments section so that we can learn from each other. Thanks! 🙂

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  • Morgan

    I agree with this article, I avoided the pill like the plague because of these things. I even made the mistake if taking the morning after pill once, I was dead emotionally and my sex drive was non-existent for a month!!

    I do want to point out though that iuds may be a perfect alternative. Yes, they have hormones (not all though). But the thing with iuds is that they’re inside your uterus, and while they have found that small amounts enter the bloodstream, it’s usually less than 5% of the hormones in the iud, and that’s a generous percent. I have one, and my sex drive is in fact higher (though higher sex drive has not been linked to iuds), and I don’t feel any different personality wise, and I’m still attracted to the same masculine man that I was before I got my iud.

    I do admit though that I had more cramps and spotting (which is just early stuff for the Kyleena-my iud) and that I felt guilty because the iud thins the lining of the uterus, and I felt bad for shoving something into her, because it was so painful that I cried. But other than that, no changes. The iud doesn’t even prevent the release of an egg like the pill does, I still ovulate, and the pill preventing ovulation has been found to be the cause of many of the pills symptoms, ESPECIALLY hair loss! (TMI ALERT-I can tell I still ovulate by my discharge and my ovulation symptoms that I am deeply familiar with).

    Honestly, the iud of course has its downsides, but if you’re someone like me and need to feel more secure when it comes to preventing pregnancy, the benefits out way the cost in my opinion.

    When it comes to any birth control though, your best bet is always to avoid contraceptives with estrogen. 🙂

  • Morgan

    I agree with this article, I avoided the pill like the plague because of these things. I even made the mistake if taking the morning after pill once, I was dead emotionally and my sex drive was non-existent for a month!!

    I do want to point out though that iuds may be a perfect alternative. Yes, they have hormones (not all though). But the thing with iuds is that they’re inside your uterus, and while they have found that small amounts enter the bloodstream, it’s usually less than 5% of the hormones in the iud, and that’s a generous percent. I have one, and my sex drive is in fact higher (though higher sex drive has not been linked to iuds), and I don’t feel any different personality wise, and I’m still attracted to the same masculine man that I was before I got my iud.

    I do admit though that I had more cramps and spotting (which is just early stuff for the Kyleena-my iud) and that I felt guilty because the iud thins the lining of the uterus, and I felt bad for shoving something into her, because it was so painful that I cried. But other than that, no changes. The iud doesn’t even prevent the release of an egg like the pill does, I still ovulate, and the pill preventing ovulation has been found to be the cause of many of the pills symptoms, ESPECIALLY hair loss! (TMI ALERT-I can tell I still ovulate by my discharge and my ovulation symptoms that I am deeply familiar with).

    Honestly, the iud of course has its downsides, but if you’re someone like me and need to feel more secure when it comes to preventing pregnancy, the benefits out way the cost in my opinion.

    When it comes to any birth control though, your best bet is always to avoid contraceptives with estrogen. 🙂

  • Anna

    I have never been on the pill and never will. I would never put that sh*t in my body.

  • sugarnspicelass

    I know it’s not mentioned in this blog (perhaps it is on the Mercola site she referenced), but I developed hypothyroidism thanks to years of oral contraceptive use. All those unnatural levels of estrogen constantly being pumped into my body (one that apparently already makes enough of its own estrogen), destroyed my thyroid. My doctor could find no other cause for my thyroid condition. I know another woman (who is in her twenties) who ended up with life-threatening blood clots once she started taking the pill. Chances might be decent that nothing serious happens to you if you use these, but the fact of the matter is there are very real negative consequences of the pill for some very real women.

  • Shamira Davis

    I’ve been on Yaz birth control for 5 months now. For the first few months I was fine but now it’s nothing but painful sex with vaginal dryness . Keep in mind my boyfriend and I have been together almost two years and never had this problem until now . Also my hormones are really messed up . I thought this would be a great decision until we get married and the fact of having no worries was awesome but now I’m starting to regret this . I think this is going to be my last month on it .

  • Nyx

    I’m pretty sure the pill gave me uterine fibroids. However natural methods are not as effect. Charting your cycle means a woman has to have a regular cycle and many women don’t. The basal method means taking your temperature every morning and who has time for that? Also some women ovulate without a rise in their basal temperature. These methods have about a 24% failure rate. Some people say they work great but everybody is different. Different genetics, different hormone levels, different diet and lifestyle… That affects it. if you don’t care about getting pregnant then fine but for some women it’s just not worth the risk. I’m sorry but one of the reasons that the pill is as popular is because it is one of the most effective forms of birth control, under the shot, implant, IUD and sterilization. Compared to the shot, implant and IUD it tends to have less side effects. It has has side effects of course, but when women are give the option of ‘side effects or sterilization’ many don’t feel they have a choice. Relying on ‘natural methods’ is a crap shoot. Fine for some women but not fine for others. We are still a ways away from having a highly effective birth control method that doesn’t cause a host of issues.

  • Emily

    Interesting article, however I agree with some of the other comments, It would definitely be nice to have links to some of the studies that support these claims. I used birth control pills from the age of 18 to 34, only breaking from them every once in a while due to not having insurance or being able to afford 25 a month, and when I wasn’t in a relationship, there wasn’t a point.
    Anyway, it never impacted my sex drive negatively, and the benefits far outweighed the risks for me. It really depends on women’s individual experiences. Of all the birth control methods, it does tend to be the most effective for preventing pregnancy. There is also something very equalizing about women being able to control when they will get pregnant. So I think positing that the use of them is a “tragedy” is extreme.
    Now I’m 34, and I’m going off of them because they are expensive and I’m not in a relationship. I’m hoping that at my age, men who want to date me will understand that my readiness for a child is no longer in question. Hopefully someone will still be amenable to using condoms.

  • Tanya Rachel Wieczorek

    Hello Renee – not really on topic but sort of! – sorry for posting this here but I’ve been reading some of your older articles, the one called How Men & Women Destroy Each Other, at the end you mentioned that you would soon write an article about ‘how to fulfill your man’s sexual needs without giving him sex’ – honestly I cannot find this article? Perhaps I’ve just missed it somehow (quite possible;)) (the comments are closed there, that’s why I had to ask this elsewhere)

    Please if you can would you post the link to this article?

    Thank you so much!

  • Elizabeth Kings

    Love spell came out tremendously, I highly recommending robinson.buckler@yahoo.com for whatever problems you are experiencing in your relationship. He is the real deal. his love spell is absolutely wonderful…

  • Em

    I started taking a birth control pill about four months ago. I skipped the sugar pills and when you do that you aren’t supposed to get your period. Now I initially wanted to take the pills so I wouldn’t get pregnant, but it was also to help with my horrible period cramps. The first week of taking them I was throwing up and sick. After that went away I started having horrible nightmares and mood swings. It started causing problems in my relationship. I just got my period while taking the pink pills. It has been the worst period I’ve ever had, and super long, way past normal. Also my blood is clotting like crazy! After doing research it isn’t even worth it to be on the pill! Get off it!

  • Najat

    what do you then suggest? is the hormone iud any better?

  • Chan RT

    I’ve been taking ortho novum for 7 years due to bad cramping during periods. I haven’t had any problems on the pill.

  • Derek Standford

    Renee – are you a doctor? This article is so misinformed and filled with so many incorrect statements it’s frustrating when articles that talk about the pill don’t see two sides of it but are heavily based on bias and personal opinions. You were already prone to all those side effects but for some-Birth control makes it worse. Which is why there are side effects written on the instructions of those packages – maybe reading is your problem? You’re blaming a pill and a dermatologist on the issues you delveoped because you were worried about acne ? How is that the pills fault or the dermtaologist that was trying to help you? As a 15 year old I’m sure acne Can be a huge issue for a lot of teens , so I don’t blame u for being eager to get rid of it. However blaming someone else for your lack of carelessness is sad. At 15 I’m sure u knew how to read right? At 15 if you read the instructions where they tell u to stop taking the pill if you experience severe side effects was probably something that you skipped over or ignored because U wanted to get rid of your acne. Yea I can see how bad the pill is… Take responsibility for your decisions and stop creating fear and scaring women unnecessarily. I’m a women using my husbands account if you were wondering .

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  • Xanthia Gonzales

    Look it up people…tons of studies done on what she talks about. Just because she doesn’t cite her knowledge here doesn’t mean they aren’t facts. I’ve experienced low sex drive, migraines, weight gain, acne, nightmares on birth control the last 2 years. I’ve never had acne in my life until I switched birth control. I’m probably going to quit taking it. I know there are very limited options however. I originally started taking it to make my period regular.

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